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As temperatures dip, the city is making sure that Queens apartment dwellers stay nice and toasty.

Heating season kicked off on Saturday, October 1, and the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) is urging landlords in Queens and throughout the city to provide adequate heat in their residential buildings.

HPD Commissioner Mathew Wambua defended residents’ rights to basic services such as heat and hot water in their homes.

“If their landlords aren’t taking action to provide heat, they should call 3-1-1 immediately. All heat complaints are investigated,” Wambua said.

Heating season runs through May 31. The city has released guidelines for tenants and landlords of residential buildings:

When the temperatures fall below 55 degrees between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m., apartments must be heated to at least 68 degrees Fahrenheit. At night, between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m., building owners must heat apartments to 55 degrees when temperatures dip below 40 degrees. Hot water is required to be maintained at 120 degrees.

The Astoria Restoration Association is doing its part to help out during heating season.

The housing advocacy group is assisting Queens residents in applying for heat and federal financial assistance with their heating bill, a representative said.

During last year’s heating season, Queens filed 483 cases of heat and hot water problems, out of 3,581 cases reported citywide, according to HPD.

If you have any heating-related concerns, call 3-1-1.

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