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State money has dried up to support non-profits that educate and enlighten residents all over New York. This is the third year that state money (which is taxpayer money) has been unavailable to enable many valuable organizations to function effectively.

In northeast Queens, organizations like the Alley Pond Environmental Center, the Poppenhusen Institute, the Bayside Historical Society, the Queens Historical Society, the Queens Botanical Garden and the Queens Farm Museum, among other non-profits, fight to survive so that they may continue to serve and educate the community at large.

An idea has been floated by community leader and activist James Trent that would bring financial assistance to these and other groups.

Money generated by the Racino in southern Queens is taxed at a high rate. This money is supposed to be used in part for educational purposes, as is the money brought in by the state lotto. Since non-profits educate the public through school visits and other programs, shouldn’t they be entitled to a portion of the money brought in through gambling venues?

The future of many of these organizations is at stake and some may close if they are unable to receive financial support.

Henry Euler

Bayside

 

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