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Beginning March 1, fare and toll hikes will go into effect across all MTA services.

Gone are the days when subway announcements sounded as if they were spoken from Charlie Brown’s teacher. A new survey by the Straphangers Campaign found a majority of delay and disruption announcements, 59 percent, to be “clear and accurate” for the time since 1997.

“We found that transit officials are doing a better job keeping riders informed,” said Straphangers Campaign Field Organizer Jason Chin-Fatt.

When it came to basic announcements — made at or between stops and includes the station, any transfers, destination, etc. — 85 percent were clear and accurate, the survey found.

The previous 10 surveys by the organization found a majority of the announcements to be garbled or incorrect; only 40 percent of notifications in 2010 were rated as good.

The No. 4 line produced the clearest and most accurate basic announcements, earning a 100 percent rating. The L, N, Q, and No. 6 rounded out the top five, all earning 99 percent ratings.

Riders of the R suffered through the worst basic announcements — just 56 percent were rated clear and accurate.

The lines with the most garbled notices were the C, B and R train — each having at least 25 percent of announcements as inaudible.

The 2012 survey was conducted between January 17 and April 29.

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