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Councilmember Letitia James has been elected as the city's public advocate and Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer has won the comptroller's race.

The city has elected its new public advocate and comptroller— Letitia James and Scott Stringer.

Councilmember James’ win makes New York City history. As the next public advocate, she is the first woman of color to hold citywide office.

“Yes, this is indeed historic because our government must be representative of all New Yorkers,” James said in her victory speech.

“Although history is important and I am incredibly proud of what we’ve accomplished together, what I’m really proud of is of the fact that we ran a campaign centered on progressive ideals and a commitment to New York’s working families,” she added.

James, who faced no Republican in Tuesday’s general election, won with 84 percent of the vote, with 99 percent of the precincts reporting, according to unofficial results.

The November 5 election was the third time voters could cast their ballots for James in the public advocate race.

James placed first in the September Democratic primary with 36 percent of the vote, but it wasn’t enough to reach the 40 percent threshold needed to avoid a runoff.

In the October 1 runoff, James, who represents District 35, faced off against fellow Brooklyn politician State Senator Daniel Squadron. She won with 59.4 percent of the vote.

Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer did have a Republican opponent in the comptroller race, John Burnett, a former Wall Street executive, but easily won with 81 percent of the vote, with 99 percent of the precincts reporting, according to unofficial results.

“I want everyone in this city to know that I will be a comptroller who serves our city with honesty and integrity. A comptroller who listens to the voices of New Yorkers in all five boroughs so that we can work together in shaping the future of this great city,” Stringer said in his victory speech.

Like James, his biggest challenge came in the primary.

Stringer was looking at a guaranteed Democratic nomination until former governor Eliot Spitzer decided to enter the race in July.

Though Spitzer had the stigma of a prostitution scandal that forced him to resign as governor in 2008, initial polls showed him ahead. But in the days before the election, they rightfully predicted a close race. Stringer defeated Spitzer with 52.1 percent of the vote.

Updated 2:05 a.m.

 

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