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THE COURIER/File photo
THE COURIER/File photo
Mayor Bill de Blasio announced support for state Sen. Tony Avella in District 11 race.

Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Tuesday his support for state Sen. Tony Avella in the District 11 race against former City Comptroller John Liu.

“Throughout this past session, Sen. Jeff Klein and Sen. Tony Avella worked tirelessly on behalf of the residents of New York City and helped make progress on issues that had been stalled for far too long,” de Blasio said.

De Blasio added that he looks forward to working with Avella to achieve progressive goals such as increasing minimum wage, expanding affordable housing and passing the DREAM Act.

“Mayor de Blasio has been at the forefront of the fight for progressive Democratic values, and it is my honor to receive his endorsement,” Avella said. “I look forward to working together towards making New York the city that we all deserve.”

Avella also picked up backing from the Communications Workers of America, District 1 in an announcement on July 3.

Not to be outdone, Liu received numerous endorsements from labor organizations in recent weeks as well as Democratic leaders, including Queens Borough President Melinda Katz.

 

 

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