Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
RIDGEWOOD TIMES/Photo by Anthony Giudice
RIDGEWOOD TIMES/Photo by Anthony Giudice
Iggy Terranova of the Department of Sanitation announced that the organics recycling pilot program is expanding into southeast Queens.

Five southeast Queens neighborhoods will be included in the Department of Sanitation’s (DSNY) latest expansion of the NYC Organics voluntary curbside food and yard waste recycling program this fall.

Ozone Park south of 103rd Avenue and the eastern portion of Lindenwood will begin the week of Oct. 5; residents of South Ozone Park will see their organic waste collection starting the week of Oct. 12; and the collection for Howard Beach and Hamilton Beach will start the week of Nov. 2.

“We are in the process of expanding our organics program,” said Iggy Terranova, DSNY representative, at a Community Board 2 meeting last week. “Queens [District] 10 will be the next one on the market for Queens. We’re going to see that happening … hopefully it moves really well there because we want to use that as our basis on getting it out to the rest of Queens and to the rest of the city. Brooklyn [District] 6 is also getting it, so we’re pushing it as far as we can to try and make it happen for the entire city.”

The organic waste program allows items such as food scraps including fruits, vegetables, egg shells, pasta, tea bags, coffee grounds and filters, baked goods, meat and bones, flowers and houseplants, and food-soiled paper such as paper towels, napkins and paper plates to be properly recycled.

“Organic materials make up about a third of our trash,” said Kathryn Garcia, sanitation commissioner. “When you [recycle] your food and yard waste, you decrease the amount of garbage going to landfills and help create a greener and healthier New York City.”

The collected waste materials are managed locally and regionally. Some organic waste is turned into compost, and used locally by greening groups, such as urban farmers, community gardeners and street tree stewards to rebuild the city’s soil.

All single-family homes and buildings with nine or fewer residential units will automatically be enrolled into the voluntary program. Buildings with 10 or more residential units may apply online to participate.

With the organics program continuing to expand into more neighborhoods, Terranova highlighted the DSNY’s need to be prepared to properly pick up the waste.

“We have been thinking about it, logistic-wise, how are we going to pick it up. We just can’t say we are going to start organics in your neighborhood and not have the trucks to come pick it up,” Terranova said. “We have to make sure we have the proper trucks … so look forward to that happening very soon.”

The DSNY previously brought the organics collection program to Glendale, Maspeth and Middle Village.

For more information, visit the DSNY’s website.

Comments:

Join The Discussion



Related Stories
Chair of Queens Community Board 2, Pat O’Brien, steps down to focus on family
Chair of Queens Community Board 2, Pat O’Brien, steps down to focus on family
$100M transformation to turn Queens Boulevard into ‘Boulevard of Life’ begins
$100M transformation to turn Queens Boulevard into ‘Boulevard of Life’ begins
Popular Stories
Photos by Suzanne Monteverdi/QNS
PHOTOS: 'The Crown Room' is the newest hot spot on Bayside's Bell Boulevard
Photo via Shutterstock
South Queens woman used a cleaver to hack her aunt to death in their home: DA
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Matthew Straubmuller
Paul Simon will play an intimate concert in LIC to support local arts nonprofit


Skip to toolbar
Web Analytics