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Photo: A rendering of the One Flushing Project (Monadnock Development)
Photo: A rendering of the One Flushing Project (Monadnock Development)

While part of a citywide push for more affordable housing, a mixed-use residential development project in downtown Flushing, Queens, got the thumbs-down from Community Board 7 at its Monday meeting.

The vote echoed concerns from local residents about construction in the already crowded area, adding that while the area needs affordable housing, the project belonged somewhere else.

“It’s become very crowded,” said Katherine, a longtime resident of College Point. “You need some place where you can go that you can afford to live.”

The Brooklyn-based residential contractor Monadnock Development expects to begin construction on a city-owned public parking lot at 133-55 41st Ave. this summer or fall. Plans for the dubbed “One Flushing” project were filed with the city’s Department of Buildings last week.

The apartments would provide affordable housing for middle-income and low-income families and seniors. Nearly 184,000 square feet of residential space would be used to hold 208 apartments.

The One Flushing project would replace a public parking garage that holds 229 spaces. Along with retail development, the mixed-use building would also include 150 replacement parking spaces. The project will also feature a community facility program, a rooftop farm and weatherization services for residents.

The developers are seeking a special permit from the city’s Board of Standards and Appeals to rezone the site to the adjacent district. CB 7 members recommended that the permit be denied until the developers reconsider its recommendations on altering the plan.

CB 7 Land Use Chair Chuck Apelian said during the meeting that the board also disagrees with providing a mayoral zoning override for a loading berth and a designated zoning requirement known as mandatory inclusionary housing that would specify some of the units as permanently affordable housing.

“Unless somebody listens to us, that project should not go through,” Chairperson Eugene Kelty said.

The community board agreed not to move forward provisionally with the plan until the changes were made. However, there was general consensus that affordable housing is much needed in an area with increasing development.

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