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Arepas de Chocolate from Arepa Lady
Arepas de Chocolate from Arepa Lady

Here’s something for the herbivores.

Howard Walfish, who created the website Lost Vegetarian, and QNS food writer Joe DiStefano will lead Vegetarian Delights of Jackson Heights, a guided tour of non-meat delicacies from South Asia to South America, on Saturday, May 14. Tickets for this roughly three-hour foodie trek cost $64.29 each, and the group will meet at Diversity Plaza, 37th Road between 73rd and 74th streets, at 2 p.m.

Participants will explore dishes from two continents and seven countries, all within a few blocks. The South Asian leg will begin with Indian chaat, before delving into Tibetan momo dumplings, Nepalese rice donuts and Punjabi specialties. Then they will “travel” to South America to sample Mexican and Colombian treats, including those offered by Arepa Lady.

About midway through the walk, there will be a shopping break at Patel Brothers, the South East Asian grocery store on 74th Street.

Walfish is the co-founder of Eat to Blog and the creator of Brooklyn Vegetarian. He highlights restaurants with meatless options, shares recipes and reviews food events. His recurring post, Vegetarian Offal, examines ways to prepare and enjoy food scraps, such as scallion roots, shiitake stems and broccoli marrow.

DiStefano runs the Queens-based website Chopsticks + Marrow. He frequently leads food tours of the borough, including the Queens Dinner Club, and organizes large culinary feasts via New York Epicurean Events.

Dahi Puri from Raja Fast Foods and Sweets

Dahi Puri from Raja Fast Foods and Sweets

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