Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
Fish In Love

Birds do it. Bees do it. Even fishes in the seas do it.

The Museum of the Moving Image will present Love Lives of Sea Creatures, an afternoon of short films exploring fishy reproductive behavior, on Sunday, March 26, at 4:30 p.m. Plus, a few professionals from the film and marine biology worlds will discuss related topics at Redstone Theater in Astoria’s Kaufman Arts District.

The program includes four rare shorts made by French inventor and photographer Jean Painlevé with one of the world’s first underwater cameras. “The Sea Horse,” a 1933 documentary on the only fish that swims upright, headlines the set. Attendees will watch how a female places her eggs in a male’s pouch, where they are fertilized. Then they’ll follow the embryo as it grows and hatches.

The other scheduled Painlevé pieces follow:

  • ACERA(1972) shows small mollusks in mud flats along the northwestern coast of France. They dance, spin, form chains, mate, and secrete eggs. After the eggs hatch, the cycle of life starts another loop.
  • Shrimp Stories(1964) looks at shrimp eating, digesting, and cleaning themselves. Then the female lays eggs that cling to her feet. Three weeks later, the larvae hatch and start their swim to adulthood.
  • The Love Life of the Octopus(1967) depicts a mating ritual during which a male grabs and female and inserts his third arm into her lung (or breathing cavity). But in another scene, a female is the predator in a multi-day mating act. She releases fertilized eggs that stick to the roof of a nest that she guards. About a month later, the eggs develop, hatch, and swim away.

Attendees will then check out Isabella Rossellini’s Green Porno series on how anchovy, shrimp, squid, and starfish reproduce. Isabella is a daughter of the legendary director of Italian Neorealist cinema Roberto Rossellini and Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman. As such, Roberto’s 11-minute “Fantasia Sottomarina” (1940), which is about two fish in love, will show. The main characters are threatened by an octopus and then saved by an eel.

Isabella, who is currently getting a masters in Animal Behavior and Conservation at Hunter College, will be in attendance. She’ll lead a discussion.

The afternoon will end with Mandë Holford, a marine chemical biologist and assistant professor at Hunter College who has scientific appointments at the American Museum of Natural History and Weill Cornell Medical College. The Ph.D. holder will share her research on using marine snail venom to develop drugs to treat pain and cancer.

Love Lives of Sea Creatures is part of the museum’s Science on the Screen series, which pairs films and discussions with scientists and movie makers. The next event, Somnambulism, When Dreams Come True: The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, is scheduled for Sunday, May 21, at 4 p.m. The subject matter is neurology and sleepwalking.

Fish in Love

Top image: Dr. Tom Bailey/Aquariumfish.net; bottom image:a still from The Seahorse, 1934, © 2017 Archives Jean Painlevé, Paris

Comments:

Join The Discussion



Related Stories
Middle Village native wins prestigious scholarship to continue her education overseas
Middle Village native wins prestigious scholarship to continue her education overseas
Astoria residents vie for win in national music competition
Astoria residents vie for win in national music competition
Popular Stories
Photo via Shutterstock/Insets courtesy of NYPD
Thieves use cloned debit cards at Queens ATMs to steal thousands from victims' bank accounts
Photo: Instagram/@dixie.harper
Take a look at the impact that yesterday's severe storm had on Queens
Photo via Google Maps
New security cameras are coming to this Whitestone school after scare earlier this year


Skip to toolbar