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Images courtesy of Michael Moran

One Long Island City nonprofit is being recognized for its excellence in preserving a century-old building, home to a former trolley repair shop, and converting it into a large art institution with its recent renovation and expansion.

The SculptureCenter, located at 44-19 Purves St., has been chosen as one of nine winners of the 25th Lucy G. Moses Preservation Awards, which will hold a ceremony on April 30 in Brooklyn.

These awards, also called the “Preservation Oscars,” are known as the New York Landmarks Conservancy’s highest honors of excellence in preservation.

The Long Island City institution was chosen for its renovation of the original 1908 brick building, which it moved into in 2002, and a 2,000-square-foot expansion which complements the site. The project was designed by Andrew Berman Architect, who has also designed projects for The New York Public Library and MoMA PS1. 

“The Moses Awards celebrate terrific preservation projects. Several of this year’s award winners demonstrate how historic buildings can be adapted to meet contemporary needs and add economic vitality in neighborhoods across the city,” said Peg Breen, president of The New York Landmarks Conservancy.

The SculptureCenter’s addition, which maintains the steel and brick structure of the existing building, gives the location a street presence while also increasing gallery and programming space. The one-story building houses an entrance lobby providing guests with ticketing, orientation and services such as restroom facilities, a bookshop and various gallery spaces.

A new 1,500-square-foot enclosed courtyard was also created to be used for outdoor exhibitions and events. Some upgrades to electrical and mechanical systems and improvements in office and storage space were also made as part of the renovations.

“SculptureCenter is honored to receive this year’s Lucy G. Moses Preservation Award. Andrew Berman’s sensitive and thoughtful expansion and renovation honors the dramatic steel and brick structure of the existing building while creating a stronger street presence as well as generously proportioned new spaces for the production and display of sculpture,” said Mary Ceruti, executive director and chief curator at SculptureCenter. “As the neighborhood becomes populated with more glass and steel, we felt it was important to preserve some of its industrial history.”

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