Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
QUEENS COURIER/Photo by Anthony Giudice
QUEENS COURIER/Photo by Anthony Giudice
City Comptroller Scott M. Stringer, surrounded by users of Queens Borough Public Libraries, revealed the finds of the first audit of the libraries in almost 20 years.

Executives at the Queens Borough Public Library (QBPL) spent millions of dollars on themselves while claiming the library was in debt and reducing both staff and services, according to an audit that City Comptroller Scott Stringer revealed during a press conference Wednesday morning outside the Astoria public library.

The investigation revealed that Thomas Galante, former QBPL CEO and president as well as other library executives — including current interim CEO Bridget Quinn-Carey — spent over $300,000 on prohibited, extravagant items such as meals, alcohol, concert tickets and airline upgrades. The spending occurred all while library officials claimed the system was running a deficit, according to the audit.

“For years … Galante and his executive team used the library as their personal piggy banks,” Stringer said. “Today, that era is coming to a definitive close.”

Prior to this investigation, a stipulation put in place by a previous administration blocked the comptroller’s office from looking at any QBPL financial records, except for two funds that the library claimed had city money. This roadblock allowed library staff to spend money with impunity. In December 2014, a newly formed QBPL board of trustees fired Galante and voted to give Stringer’s office full access to library financial records.

Carl S. Koerner, chair of the Queens Library board of trustees, said in a statement Wednesday that Queens Library was working to reform the system from top to bottom.

“Like other investigations into the library’s finances over the past year, today’s audit confirms many disturbing practices of the library’s prior director and its complacent former trustees —which is why the current board reversed an earlier decision and unanimously voted to give the comptroller’s office full access to all of the library’s bank accounts,” Koerner said.

But Stringer pointed out that Galante’s interim replacement, Quinn-Carey, was also involved in unscrupulous spending of city funds, as noted in the audit.

“Former COO and interim CEO Bridget Quinn-Carey also made a number of prohibited purchases totaling more than $48,000, including $11,500 for food and booze, 70 gift cards and 22 charges worth $4,000 with no explanation at all,” Stringer said.

In addition to inappropriately spending, the comptroller noted, the library’s senior staff increased their salaries by seven percent and cut library operating hours during Galante’s tenure.

“As they were scaling back access to books, Internet and vital programs and services, they were lining their own pockets,” Stringer charged.

The audit found that during fiscal years 2008 to 2013, the library staff charged all of its operating expenses to the library’s “city fund” account, which is subject to review by the comptroller’s office. This led to the library to appear to be running a deficit that ranged from $5.7 to $6.9 million, which enabled Galante to ask the City Council for more funds, all while the library had between $17 to $27 million in unrestricted funds.

Library executives may also owe personal income tax on purchases made, and they may have made fraudulent purchases. Galante failed to disclose the three businesses that he owns on city integrity forms, only divulging the information when he learned of the audit.

The audit has been submitted to law enforcement agencies for further investigation and action, Stringer said.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Comments:

Join The Discussion



Profile picture
Tillman December 10, 2015 / 03:56AM
Sounds much like the IRS's penchant for line-dancing lessons, musical ensembles, costly dinners and leisure trips plus over-the-top perks, bonuses, salaries, and various other treats of recent years that were reported and made public.
Reply

Related Stories
City lays out plans to finally complete long-delayed Middle Village sewer project
City lays out plans to finally complete long-delayed Middle Village sewer project
City Comptroller Scott Stringer visits Jackson Heights to endorse Jessica Ramos for state Senate seat
City Comptroller Scott Stringer visits Jackson Heights to endorse Jessica Ramos for state Senate seat
Popular Stories
Photo via Google Maps, insets courtesy of the NYPD
Crooks break into five northeast Queens homes in one day and steal a small fortune in jewelry: cops
Photo via Google Maps
Queens councilman confirms men's homeless shelter will come to College Point (UPDATED)
DCPI
Detectives seek suspects caught on camera trying to break into a Middle Village home


Skip to toolbar