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So classic yet so current.

The Chieftans, a six-time Grammy-winning Irish band, will perform at Queens College’s Colden Auditorium in Flushing on Saturday, March 4, at 8 p.m.

There should be some magic in the air on this night, as Paddy Moloney, who founded the group in 1962, will return to the stage as a special (78-year-old) guest.

Over a career that now spans half a century — The Chieftains, whose name comes from the book “Death of a Chieftan & Other Stories” by Irish poet John Montague — have blended traditional Irish folk music with modern and international genres.

Instrumentation includes tin whistles, uilleann pipes, button accordion, bodhrán (a frame drum traditionally made with a wooden body and a goat-skin head), fiddle, flute, harp, concertina, and the more common drums, vocals, keyboards, and guitar. There’s step-dancing, too.

The group has collaborated with a wide variety of artists, including Luciano Pavarotti, the Rolling Stones, Madonna, Elvis Costello, Van Morrison, Sinéad O’Connor, and Roger Daltry from the Who.

The result is a completely unique sound that continues to evolve.

Tickets run from $39 to $69.

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