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The first gig kicks off a new series. The second show completes an old one.

Queens Botanical Garden presents Community Concert for Kids on Saturday, Oct. 6, at 11 a.m. The same Flushing venue hosts Riva & Bohio Music on Sunday, Oct. 7, at 3:30 p.m.

Musica Reginae Productions will lead a free interactive event for children (ages 4 and up) and their families on Saturday using nature as a source of inspiration for songs. To last about an hour, Musica Reginae members will explain how composers find their inspiration. They will also demonstrate how a piece inspired by nature — like water, for instance — might sound, while exploring the ways stories are told through music.

The musicians and children will also create their own songs.

Founded in 2000, Musica Reginae organizes family-friendly concerts throughout the borough, although most take place at its base, The Church-in-the-Gardens in Forest Hills. The Community Concert for Kids launches its 2018-2019 Making Music series, which includes 10 more recitals, running until May 11, 2019. Those gigs have names like “Bach Meets the 21st Century,” “An Afternoon of Chamber Music,” “Beethoven Meets Stradivarius,” and “Istanbul to Kathmandu.”

The Sunday performance is the final act in Queens Botanical Garden’s annual Music in the Garden series.

The lead singer, Riva Nyri Précil, was born in Brooklyn, but she grew up in Haiti. Many of her songs mix traditional sounds from the Caribbean island with jazzy modern twists, and she sings in English, French, and Creole.

Heavy on dancing, her art is inspired by Racine (roots), a form of Voodoo songs, rituals, drumming, and movement designed to engage the spirit world to heal or ward off negative events and energies.

Her band, Bohio Music, does a fusion of jazz with Haitian rhythms and hints of Reggae and African tones. Its name derives from the Taino word that means “rich in villages” in English. The Tainos were the main inhabitants of Haiti and the Dominican Republic before Europeans discovered the island.

Queens Botanical Garden is located at 43-50 Main St.

Editor’s note: Don’t forget the Pumpkin Patch! Queens Botanical Garden will maintain its annual pumpkin patch every weekend in October and on Columbus Day.

Images: Riva Nyri Précil, Musica Reginae, Bohio Music, and Queens Botanical Garden

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