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Photo via Twitter/JLa_NYC

Protests over the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin continued in Astoria and Bayside Tuesday afternoon.

Hundreds of people gathered on Steinway Street and 30th Avenue in Astoria to peacefully call for an end to police violence against Black people.

Protesters chanted Floyd’s name, as well as that of Breonna Taylor, a Black woman shot eight times in her own Louisville, Kentucky apartment by police officers.

Drivers honked their car horns in support of the protesters as they drove by.

After gathering in one of Astoria’s most prominent businesses corridors, the protesters marched down Steinway Street, chanting, “No justice, no peace,” as they made their way north, the direction of the 114th Precinct on Astoria Boulevard.

Tuesday’s protest follows a peaceful vigil for Floyd held in Astoria Park Monday night.

The protest in Astoria was not the only one to take place in Queens Tuesday. A group of approximately 50 to 60 people were seen peacefully marching down Northern Boulevard in Bayside.

The Bayside protest began in Fort Totten Park early Tuesday afternoon. Following a moment of silence, protesters made their way down the Cross Island Parkway.

The march moved on to Northern Boulevard, as protesters moved towards the 111th Precinct. Those driving by honked their horns in support. Other’s cheered and clapped from inside their homes.

Senator John Liu, who’s been on the ground at several protests throughout the city, joined protesters as they called for justice.

Upon arriving at the 111th Precinct, the group took a knee and held a second moment of silence. Following the moment of silence, speeches were given in support of justice for Black Americans, before the march continued on.

Additional reporting by Angélica Acevedo.

Updated at 3:32 p.m., Tuesday, June 2.

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