Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
Photo courtesy of Roger Gendron
Photo courtesy of Roger Gendron
After more than a year, the boardwalk between Hamilton Beach and Howard Beach is going to be repaired.

The city is finally repairing the boardwalk connecting Hamilton Beach and Howard Beach after Superstorm Sandy made it dangerous to use.

“No one from the city wanted to step up and take responsibility,” said Roger Gendron, the president of the Hamilton Beach Civic Association. “But [Councilman Eric Ulrich’s office] kept going and going to get this done.”

While Ulrich’s office pushed for the repairs, which began on May 15, the Department of Citywide Administrative Services (DCAS) is ultimately responsible for doing the work since it owns the property, according to the councilman. But the department wasn’t quick to admit ownership and instead they told the community that the MTA owned the land. The two debated ownership, causing a delay in repairs.

“This is an issue we’ve been working on for more than a year,” Ulrich said. “We kept going back and forth with DCAS. We were relentless. The city has to accept responsibility for its property and we’re here to make sure that happens.”

When the flooding hit the area, Gendron explained, the boardwalk became uprooted, and now, the once-straight boardwalk curves and drops in many spots. The boardwalk also sustained damages to the individual planks. Construction workers were observed by Gendron on Tuesday, May 20, working on the site.

Hamilton Beach is a small sliver of Howard Beach and is separated from the rest of the neighborhood by canals and waterways. In an area with less than a handful of ways in and out, the boardwalk is used as a main walkway for people going to and from the Howard Beach A train station.

“Anytime we lose any way out of Hamilton Beach, it hurts,” Gendron said.

Gendron and Ulrich both said that this repair is just one among many things that needs to be fixed.

“It’s just one part of the community that needed repairs and we aim to fix them all,” Ulrich said.

DCAS did not respond to comment requests before press time, and no completion date has been set by the department. When the project is complete, according to Gendron, the department will replace the wooden planks with a concrete walkway and new railings.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

 

Comments:

Join The Discussion



Related Stories
Recent coastal flooding in south Queens prompts calls to reduce flood risks
Recent coastal flooding in south Queens prompts calls to reduce flood risks
Hamilton Beach residents look for agency responsible for graffiti cleanup
Hamilton Beach residents look for agency responsible for graffiti cleanup
Popular Stories
Photo courtesy of Cinemart Cinemas
Iconic Forest Hills movie theater is reopening tonight with new comfy 'VIP luxury leather recliner' seating
A trolley outside of the old Niederstein's Restaurant.
Happy birthday! Middle Village is pretty fly for 200 years old
Photo via Google Maps
Massage parlor worker offers a 'hand job' to an undercover cop and three other arrests in Forest Hills, Maspeth and Rego Park
Skip to toolbar