THE COURIER/Photos by Alina Suriel
Jiri Vesely played against Ivo Karlovic on Court 6 on Thursday afternoon.

It’s a tennis-palooza!

Tennis fans at the U.S. Open at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center have multiple courts to choose from in addition to four main stadiums hosting the sport’s biggest names.

While the likes of Andy Murray and John Isner could be seen at the Arthur Ashe and Louis Armstrong stadiums, simultaneous matches taking place in 11 fields and West Stadium courts allowed fans to get even closer to professional players.

Peter Kraus and Ashley Hall, a stepfather and daughter who both love the game, attended the U.S. Open together, enjoying the side games as well as major matches in the large stadiums.

“We’re tennis fans,” said Kraus, who has been playing for 40 years. “I enjoy the game and think it’s good exercise and fun.”

“It’s inspires me to keep going, because in high school matches you don’t win every match,” Hall said. “Now I’m in college and my school doesn’t have a team, but it inspires me to start a team.”

Practice fields open throughout the day for player warm-ups were also accessible to the reported 700,000 attendees expected to watch the games this year.

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Gwen Vauss, an amateur tennis player who traveled from Maryland to see the games, said she was able to see tennis legend Roger Federer at the practice courts.

“I feel like a kid in awe,” Vauss said. “This is my first U.S. Open.”

Cherron Marray, another amateur who plays tennis with Vauss, said that it was encouraging to see professional players make some of the same mistakes that she and her peers make.

“I’m just here to take in the whole experience,” Marray said. “I feel a tennis overload, but in a good way.”

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