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Queens Climate Project hosts community event to discuss climate action

Queens Climate Project hosted a Climate Block Party to spread awareness of the climate crisis and what can be done locally to address it. (Photo courtesy of Queens Climate Project)

In light of extreme weather changes occurring for the past months, Queens Climate Project’s activists arranged a Climate Block Party recently, aiming to inform community members about the dangers of climate change and how the community can step up to help.

“Residents of Queens have been battered by Ida, and unfortunately some have lost their lives. We will continue to be vulnerable to flash flooding, extreme heat and extreme weather if we don’t act,” said Elaine O’Brien of Queens Climate Project. “The last legislative session didn’t yield much climate action and we need our lawmakers to pass the Climate and Community Investment Act, the Clean Futures Act and the Build Public Renewables Act.”

Photo courtesy of Queens Climate Project
Photo courtesy of Queens Climate Project
Photo courtesy of Queens Climate Project

The Queens Climate Project is a group made up of Queens residents who are determined to aid the borough and the city toward a healthier and carbon-free future. The objective of this group is to advocate for strong and equitable clean energy policies and engage in advocacy and climate-related initiatives.

On Saturday, Sept. 25, in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, they hosted a family-friendly Climate Block Party, filled with music, free food, activities and giveaways, with the intent of teaching attendees about composting, community gardening, recycling and equitable clean policies.

Photo courtesy of Queens Climate Project

Photo courtesy of Queens Climate Project
Photo courtesy of Queens Climate Project

The event included a lineup of environmental and climate organizations such as New York Renews, 350 New York, The Queens Botanical Gardens, TREEage, Big Reuse, the Veggie Nuggets, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards as well as middle school activists.

“We’re out here today to promote reuse. Reuse of our organic material in particular,” Gil Lopez of Big Reuse said. “It’s very important that everyone not send organic material to the landfill where it creates methane, carbon dioxide and toxic sludge. Instead, we need to reuse our organic material. This will create healthy soil, which we use to plant trees which will clean the air, flowers to enliven our communities, and food to nourish our bodies. It’s important that everyone requests a brown bin and participates in the food scrap drop-off program, and that we talk to our neighbors about composting our food scraps.”

As well as empowering the community into taking action on the climate change matter, Queens Climate Project announced at the event that they aim to reach out and work with more Queens state legislators for the 2022 legislative session.

“We are looking for even more Albany lawmakers to be champions for bold climate policies and legislation,” O’Brien said.

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