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Everything Queens voters need to know about the Nov. 3 general election – QNS.com

Everything Queens voters need to know about the Nov. 3 general election

QNS/File

Earlier this year, Queens had to wait a little over a month to hear the final results of many of the Democratic primary races held in June. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, a large portion of voters chose to send their ballots via absentee, and the count — taken on by the Board of Elections — was a big one, delaying when races could be called. 

With the Nov. 3 general election approaching, and the COVID-19 pandemic still very much in full swing across the country, Queens residents can likely expect a similar process.

Photo by Dean Moses

Regardless of the irregularities of voting this year, there is no need to be discouraged. Voting and making your voice heard is still important.  

So in case you’ve forgotten, need a refresher, or just want to double check, here is a breakdown everything you need to know about the upcoming election. 

Dates to remember

Early voting begins this year on Saturday, Oct. 24. Voters can head to their designated polling site to vote early, or use the time to drop off their absentee ballots, rather than send them in through the mail. 

Queens has 18 early voting sites this year, a list of which can be found here. If you’re unsure which voting site you are assigned to, you can search your address here

Find below the operating hours of all early voting sites. 

  • Saturday, Oct. 24, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Sunday, Oct. 25, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Monday, Oct. 26, from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Tuesday, Oct. 27, from noon to 8 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Oct. 28, from noon to 8 p.m.
  • Thursday, Oct. 29, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Friday, Oct. 30, from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Saturday, Oct. 31, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Sunday, Nov. 1 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The final day to request an absentee ballot is Tuesday, Oct. 27. Absentee ballots can be requested here. Voters are also able to request an absentee ballot in person at an early voting site or at the Board of Elections Queens County office (located at 118-35 Queens Blvd., Forest Hills, NY 11375), but must do so before Nov. 2

A sample of the New York State Absentee Ballot Application as seen on the city’s Board of Elections website.

If mailing in the absentee ballot, the envelope must be postmarked by Nov. 3, the day of the election. Expecting a large number of absentee ballots, the United States Postal Service has encouraged those voting absentee to send in their ballots as soon as possible

More information on absentee voting can be found here

Tuesday, Nov. 3, is the day of the election. If you’re choosing to vote in person, head to the polls and make your voice heard. 

A few things to keep in mind

With many irregularities, this year’s election is shaping up to be a confusing one. Here are a few things to keep in mind while figuring out your plan for voting. 

If you’re choosing to vote in person, you must wear a mask and practice social distancing at your polling site. Poll workers will be required to practice the same COVID-19 protections as the voters. Hand sanitizer will be available at all polling locations, and voting booths will be socially distanced and regularly cleaned.  

If voting absentee, be sure to follow all the rules and regulations put forth by the Board of Elections. If these rules are not followed, your vote will likely not be counted. 

After making your votes on the ballot, the ballot must be folded and placed in a smaller envelope. The voter must sign and date the back of the envelope. After sealing the envelope, it must then be placed in a larger envelope that is addressed to the county’s Board of Elections (118-35 Queens Boulevard, Forest Hills, NY 11375). The ballot can then be mailed or delivered to the Board of Elections office, early voting place or regular polling place on the day of the election. 

The candidates

In addition to the presidential election between Donald Trump and Joe Biden, a handful of other races will appear on your ballot. 

Here is a full list of every candidate running for office in Queens on Nov. 3. 

Queens borough president

Donovan Richards (Democrat)

Councilman Donovan Richards beat out four challengers to win the Democratic primary for Queens borough president in June. Richards has served in the City Council since 2013. 

Joann Ariola (Republican)

Running on the Republican, Conservative and Save Our City party lines, Ariola is the chairwoman of the Queens County Republican Party.

Third Congressional District

Tom Suozzi (Democrat)

Suozzi was first elected to Congress in 2016. He beat out a Republican challenger in 2018, earning 59 percent of the vote. Suozzi will face two challengers in November.

Howard Rabin (Libertarian) 

Rabin is running against Suozzi on the Libertarian party line. This is his first bid for public office.

George Devolder-Santos (Republican)

Devolder-Santos is challenging Suozzi on the Republican and Conservative party line. This is his first bid for public office.

Fifth Congressional District

Gregory Meeks (Democrat)

Meeks serves as the chairman of the Queens Democratic Party. He’s held his seat in southeast Queens since 1998. Meeks is running unopposed. 

Sixth Congressional District

Grace Meng (Democrat)

The incumbent, Meng, is vying for her fifth term in Congress. She is the first and only legislator of Asian descent to represent New York in the U.S. House of Representatives. She won 90 percent of the vote in 2018. 

Thomas Zmich (Republican)

Zmich, a supporter of President Donald Trump, is Meng’s challenger.

Seventh Congressional District

Nydia Velazquez (Democrat)

Velazquez, the incumbent, is a longtime congresswoman, serving in the legislative body since 1993. 

Brian Kelly (Republican)

Velazquez’s Republican challenger, Kelly previously ran for City Council in 2017, state Senate in 2010 and 2016 and State Assembly in 2014. He has never won a general election. 

Gilbert Midonnet (Libertarian) 

Midonnet, a software developer from Cobble Hill, Brooklyn, is running on the Libertarian party line. 

Eighth Congressional District

Hakeem Jeffries (Democrat)

Jeffries, the incumbent, has served in Congress since 2013. Jeffries won over 94 percent of the vote in 2018. 

Garfield Wallace (Republican)

Wallace is running against Jeffries on the Republican party line.

12th Congressional District

Carolyn Maloney (Democratic)

The longtime Congresswoman faced a tough challenge during June’s Democratic primaries, eking out a victory over three progressive challengers. One of the top Democrats in Congress, Maloney has served in the body since 1993. 

Carlos Santiago-Cano (Republican)

Santiago-Cano is running against Maloney on the Republican party line. He supports President Donald Trump, according to his Twitter profile. 

14th Congressional District

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (Democrat)

The progressive star who shocked the Queens Democratic party by defeating its leader in 2018 aims to win her second general election. 

John Cummings (Republican)

A former NYPD officer, Cummings is running against Ocasio-Cortez on the Republican party ticket. This is his first run for public office. 

10th State Senate District

James Sanders Jr. (Democrat)

Sanders has served in the state Senate since 2013, previously serving in the New York City Council. Sanders is running unopposed. 

11th State Senate District

John Liu (Democrat)

The incumbent, Liu is seeking his second term in the New York State Senate. Liu previously served as the city’s comptroller and as a councilman. 

Elisa Nahoum (Republican)

Nahoum, who has been endorsed by the Police Benevolent Association, is running against Liu on the Republican party ticket. This is her first run for public office.  

12th State Senate District

Michael Gianaris (Democrat)

Gianaris was first elected to the state Senate in 2010. He currently serves as the deputy majority leader. Gianaris is running unopposed. 

13th State Senate District

Jessica Ramos (Democrat)

Ramos is seeking her second term in office. She was elected to the state Senate in 2018 as part of the progressive wave that disbanded the Independent Democratic Conference, a group of Democrats in the state Senate who voted with Republicans. 

Jesus Gonzalez (Republican)

Gonzalez is challenging Ramos on the Republican party line. He ran for the seat in 2016, winning 13 percent of the vote against Jose Peralta, the former senator who would go on to lose to Ramos in 2018. 

14th State Senate District

Leroy Comrie Jr. (Democrat)

Comrie has served in the state Senate since 2015. He is running unopposed. 

15th State Senate District

Joseph Addabbo Jr. (Democrat)

Addabbo has served in the state Senate since 2009. He formerly served as a New York City councilman. 

Thomas Sullivan (Republican)

Sullivan is running against Addabbo on the Republican party line. He ran against the incumbent in 2018, winning nearly 36 percent of the vote. 

16th State Senate District

Toby Ann Stavisky (Democrat)

Stavisky has served in the state Senate since 1999. She is running unopposed. 

23rd Assembly District

Stacey Pheffer Amato (Democrat)

Pheffer Amato, the incumbent, is seeking her third term in the state Assembly. She was first elected in 2016.

Peter Hatzipetros (Republican) 

A Howard Beach native, Hatzipetros is running against the incumbent on the Republican party ticket. This is his first bid for office. 

24th Assembly District

David Weprin (Democrat)

Weprin has served in the state Assembly since 2010. He previously served in the New York City Council. Weprin is running unopposed. 

25th Assembly District

Nily Rozic (Democrat)

Rozic has served in the state Assembly since 2012. She is running unopposed. 

26th Assembly District

Edward Braunstein (Democrat) 

Braunstein has represented northeast Queens since 2011. He won 65 percent of the vote against a Republican challenger in 2018.  

John-Alexander Sakelos

Sakelos is running against Braunstein on the Republican, Conservative and Save Our City lines. It’s his first bid for office. 

27th Assembly District

Daniel Rosenthal (Democrat)

Rosenthal was elected to the state Assembly in 2017. He is running unopposed this year. 

28th Assembly District

Andrew Hevesi (Democrat)

Hevesi was first elected to the Assembly in 2005. He’s running unopposed this year.

29th Assembly District

Alicia Hyndman (Democrat)

Hyndman has represented her southeast Queens district in the Assembly since 2015. She is running unopposed this year. 

30th Assembly District

Brian Barnwell (Democrat)

Barnwell was elected to the Assembly in 2016. He’s running unopposed this year. 

31st Assembly District

Khaleel Anderson (Democrat)

Anderson is aiming to become the youngest Assembly member in the legislative body.  The 24-year-old activist from Far Rockaway won a crowded Democratic primary over the summer to fill former Assemblywoman Michelle Titus’ seat. 

Joseph Cullina (Republican)

Cullina is running against Anderson on the Republican party line. It’s his first bid for public office. 

32nd Assembly District

Vivian Cook (Democrat)

The longtime legislator has been in the Assembly since 1991. Cook is running unopposed this year. 

33rd Assembly District

Clyde Vanel (Democrat)

Vanel is seeking his second term in the Assembly. Elected first in 2016, Vanel is running unopposed in 2020. 

34th Assembly District

Jessica Gonzalez-Rojas (Democrat)

Gonzalez-Rojas beat out incumbent Michael DenDekker and three other challengers in the Democratic primary over the summer. It’s her first bid for public office.  

William Marquez (Republican)

Marquez is challenging Gonzalez-Rojas on the Reublican and Conservative party line. It’s his first bid for public office. 

35th Assembly District

Jeffrion Aubry (Democrat)

Aubry first assumed office in the Assembly in 1992. He beat out convicted felon and former state Senator Hiram Monserrate in the Democratic primary race over the summer. 

Han-Kohn To (Conservative)

To is running on the Conservative and Save Our City party lines against Aubry. It’s To’s first race for office. 

36th Assembly District

Zohran Kwame Mamdani (Democrat)

Mamdani beat out incumbent Aravella Simotas during June’s Democratic primary. The Democratic Socialist is running unopposed and seeking his first seat in public office. 

37th Assembly District

Catherine Nolan (Democrat)

Nolan was first elected to the Assembly in 1985. She’s running unopposed in 2020 after beating out two challengers in the Democratic primary earlier this year. 

38th Assembly District

Jenifer Rajkumar (Democrat)

Rajkumar ousted Assemblyman Mike Miller during June’s Democratic primaries. She’s seeking her first seat in public office.

Giovanni Perna (Republican)

Challenging Rajkumar, Perna is running on the Republican and Conservative party lines. This is his first bid for public office. 

39th Assembly District

Catalina Cruz (Democrat) 

Cruz, who was elected to the Assembly in 2018, is seeking her second term in office. She is running unopposed. 

40th Assembly District

Ron Kim (Democrat)

Kim was first elected to the assembly in 2012. He is running unopposed. 

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