Quantcast

Queens Alzheimer’s Association walk raises more than $80,000

Participants attend the Queens Walk to End Alzheimer's event at Flushing Meadows Corona Park.
Members of Team United in Hope for Georgina and Our Loved Ones at the Queens Walk to End Alzheimer’s at Flushing Meadows Corona Park on Saturday, Oct. 1. (Photo courtesy of The Alzheimer’s Association)

More than 100 supporters braved blustery, wet conditions to participate at the Queens Walk to End Alzheimer’s in Flushing Meadows Corona Park on Saturday, Oct. 1, while 350 more people joined from home helping to raise more than $80,000 for care, support and research programs at the Alzheimer’s Association.

Supporters along the route of the Queens Walk to End Alzheimer’s event held at Flushing Meadows Corona Park on Saturday, Oct. 1. (Photo courtesy of The Alzheimer’s Association)

Emily Lorsch of CNBC and Queens Walk Co-Chair Melissa Warten served as emcees for the opening ceremony. They welcomed the crowd and celebrated recent successes in the fight to end Alzheimer’s.

Earlier this month, researchers reported positive findings from a clinical trial of a drug called lecanemab. It slowed cognitive decline by 27% compared to a placebo and the FDA is expected to decide on its approval by early January 2023.

Melissa Warten and Emily Lorsch lead the opening ceremony at the Queens Walk to End Alzheimer’s at Flushing Meadows Corona Park. (Photo courtesy of The Alzheimer’s Association)

We are making progress and there is hope. One day, we will end this disease. And we’re going to do it together!” Warten said.

Warten also congratulated top fundraisers including Scott Winter, of Team Jim’s Winter Warriors, who lost his father Jim to Alzheimer’s.

“I hate this disease. It was devastating to watch my father deteriorate. That’s why I walk every year,” Winter said. “We have momentum now with the positive treatment news. And we’re not going to stop.”

Scott Winter, of Team Jim’s Winter Warriors (Photo courtesy of The Alzheimer’s Association)

The opening ceremony included a rousing rendition of the National Anthem from Danielle Atkinson. David Feiner of Team Babs and his family cut the start line ribbon for walkers. The cheerleading squad of Saint Francis Preparatory School kept the energy up as the walk started. Throughout the event, participants enjoyed pumpkin painting and custom temporary tattoos courtesy of Face Art by Melissa at the Fun Zone as well as free massages from Nigel Hunt, AAS, LMT.

Supporters write the names of loved ones on flowers at the Queens Walk to End Alzheimer’s. (Photo courtesy of The Alzheimer’s Association)

“The Queens Walk to End Alzheimer’s includes so many family caregivers. We wanted them to have some time for fun and self-care, because that is often sacrificed when a loved one has dementia,” said Sophie Lesser, Queens Walk manager. 

A child gets a temporary tattoo painting at the Queens Walk to End Alzheimer’s. (Photo courtesy of The Alzheimer’s Association)

More than 6 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease — a leading cause of death in the United States — including more than 410,000 in New York. Additionally, more than 11 million family members and friends provide care to people living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

 The Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s is the world’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Since 1989, the Alzheimer’s Association mobilized millions of Americans in the Alzheimer’s Association Memory Walk. Now, the Alzheimer’s Association is continuing to lead the way with Walk to End Alzheimer’s.

 The success of the Queens Walk to End Alzheimer’s was made possible thanks to its committee co-chairs Diane Marinconz and Warten; committee members Nicole Devita, Robin Gitomer, Catherine Heege and Alexis Mark; and local sponsors Cannataro Family Capital Partners and Main Street Radiology.

Participants at the Queens Walk to End Alzheimer’s (Photo courtesy of The Alzheimer’s Association)

More from Around New York