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A new community garden is coming to Ridgewood this spring

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NYC Parks will add a new community garden in Ridgewood, located in the Grover Cleveland Athletic Field at the intersection of Willoughby Avenue and Onderdonk Avenue. (Screenshot via Google Maps)

The NYC Department of Parks and Recreation will add a new community garden in Ridgewood this spring as part of its GreenThumb program meant to add green spaces around the city. 

In 2021, the GreenThumb program has been able to add three new gardens to the city while upgrading 24 established community gardens across the city. The newest garden in Ridgewood, located near the Grover Cleveland Athletic Field at the intersection of Willoughby Avenue and Onderdonk Avenue, will be open and run by local volunteers after construction is completed in the spring.

“Our community gardens, and the dedicated community gardeners that maintain and program them, are an intrinsic part of the fabric of our city, increasing green space access and equity for New Yorkers in every borough,” NYC Parks Acting Commissioner Liam Kavanagh said. “I am proud of the work that was accomplished by our GreenThumb team this past year, and I look forward to another great year of renovations, upgrades and build-outs. We remain dedicated to supporting our gardens during the ongoing pandemic and beyond.”

The Ridgewood garden will be open to the public for a minimum of 20 hours per week during the official GreenThumb garden season from April 1 through Oct. 31.

In 2021, GreenThumb delivered over 300,000 seeds and 100,000 plants to gardens across the five boroughs. The city established the program in 1978 to provide environmental, economic and social benefits to the gardens’ neighborhoods. Free garden materials, technical assistance and educational workshops are also provided through GreenThumb.

NYC Parks GreenThumb Director Carlos Martinez said community gardens are a vital part of the city’s social infrastructure.

“Today, more than 550 blossoming gardens across the city play a critical role as we recover from the pandemic,” NYC Parks GreenThumb Director Carlos Martinez said. “In partnership with our local volunteer gardeners and greening partners, GreenThumb expanded its support to assist vulnerable communities in their efforts to address food insecurity and redesign spaces that offer a respite during these challenging times.”

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