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UPDATES: Board of Elections releases ranked-choice voting calculations for Queens borough president race and local City Council contests

Campaign watchers observe the canvass of ballots at the Helen Marshall Cultural Center at Queens Borough Hall on June 28, 2021. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)

The city’s Board of Elections (BOE) on Tuesday night, July 6, released updated results from its preliminary ranked-choice voting (RCV) calculations for the Queens borough president race and local City Council contests.

Results had been expected to be released earlier in the week, but following tabulation errors in the mayoral race, the BOE elected to hold off on revealing results for the local races. 

According to the newly released results for the borough president race, incumbent Donovan Richards currently holds the top spot with 50.3 percent of the vote (92,149 votes) after three rounds of RCV counting. Challenger Elizabeth Crowley, the former District 30 councilwoman, sits in second place with 49.7 percent of the vote (91,105 votes).

Donovan Richards is the incumbent Queens borough president. (Photo courtesy of campaign)

Results are not yet official — the BOE expects to have certified results by July 12. 

Richards released a statement Tuesday night celebrating his apparent victory.

“I am honored that the voters have placed their faith in me to continue our Queens comeback,” Richards said. “Our team has done so much in just over 150 days in office, opening an immigrant welcome center at Borough Hall, breaking ground on new units of real affordable housing, diversifying our Community Boards, and helping our small businesses. We’re ready to get back to work and build a Queens that works for everyone. I would like to thank everyone on my team for their incredible effort on this campaign, especially our devoted campaign staff and volunteers. If you made a call, knocked on a door, or sent a text — you made this happen! Let’s celebrate this victory and then, let’s get to work!”

Meanwhile, after the BOE had released updated results on Friday, July 2, Crowley’s campaign had remained “optimistic as the Board of Elections continues to count ballots from throughout the borough.”

“We believe that when all the absentees are counted, and the final RCV rounds are tabulated, we will be the campaign with the most votes,” campaign spokesperson Graham Nolen had said.

Crowely tweeted Wednesday that her campaign “is evaluating the numbers from the Board of Elections and will make a determination about our next steps once every vote gets counted.”

In addition to the borough president race, the BOE released preliminary results for all of the City Council races in Queens. 

See the unofficial results below.

City Council District 19 (Auburndale, Bay Terrace, Bayside, Beechhurst, College Point, Douglaston, Flushing, Little Neck, Malba and Whitestone)

Tony Avella currently holds the top spot among Democratic candidates, having received 54.7 percent of the votes (6,427 votes) following four rounds of RCV counting. Richard J. Lee finished in second with 45.3 percent of the vote (5,312 votes). Other candidates include Adriana Aviles, Nabaraj KC, Austin Shafran and Francis E. Spangenberg.

As for the Republican primary, Vickie Paladino secured 51.6 percent of the vote (1,765 votes). John-Alexander Sakelos trailed with 47 percent of the vote. Because Paladino secured more than 50 percent of the vote, a ranked-choice voting recount was not triggered in this race.

City Council District 20 (Downtown Flushing, Murray Hill, Queensboro Hill)

Sandra Ung currently holds the top spot among Democratic candidates, having received 55.2 percent of the votes (4,202 votes) following eight rounds of RCV counting. Ellen Young finished in second with 44.8 percent of the vote (3,405 votes).

Other candidates include Hailing Chen, John Choe, Anthony Mirandal, Neng Wang, Ming-Kang Low and Dao Yin.

City Council District 21 (East Elmhurst, Jackson Heights, LeFrak City and Corona)

Incumbent Francisco Moya had declared victory in the June 22 primary election after securing more than 50 percent of vote, according to unofficial results from the Board of Elections. As of July 6, Moya garnered 51.6 percent of the vote (3,532 votes), while his opponents — Ingrid Gomez (18.2 percent of the votes), David Aiken (16.3 percent), George Unuorah (7.0 percent) and Talea Wufka (6.4 percent) — did not secure enough votes to trigger a ranked-choice voting recount.

City Council District 22 (Astoria, Rikers Island, parts of Jackson Heights, Woodside and East Elmhurst)

Tiffany Cabán currently holds the top spot among Democratic candidates after securing 62.6 percent of the vote (9,085 votes) following three rounds of RCV counting. Evie Hantzopoulos finished second with 37.5 percent of the vote (5,423 votes). Other candidates include Leonardo Bullaro, John J. Ciafone, Catherina Gioino and Nicholas Velkov.

City Council District 23 (Bayside, Queens, Bellerose, Douglaston, Floral Park, Fresh Meadows, Glen Oaks, Hollis, Hollis Hills, Holliswood, Jamaica Estates, Little Neck Oakland Gardens and Queens Village)

Linda Lee currently holds the top spot among Democratic candidates after receiving 54.5 percent of the vote (7,170 votes) following five rounds of RCV counting. Jaslin Kaur finished second with 45.5 percent of the vote (5,991 votes).  Other candidates include Steve Behar, Sanjeev Kumar Jindal, Debra Markell, Harpreet Singh Toor and Koshy O. Thomas.

James F. Reilly currently holds the top spot among Republican candidates after receiving 66.5 percent of the vote (1,040). Alex Amoroso is in second place with 29.5 percent of the vote (461 votes).  Because Reilly secured more than 50 percent of the vote, a ranked-choice voting recount was not triggered in this race. 

City Council District 24 (Kew Gardens Hills, Pomonok, Electchester, Fresh Meadows, Hillcrest, Jamaica Estates, Briarwood, Parkway Village, Jamaica Hills, Jamaica)

After winning a special election earlier this year to represent Council District 24, Democratic incumbent James Gennaro took the lead in the June 22 primary race, having secured 60 percent of the vote, according to unofficial results from the New York City Board of Elections. Gennaro collected 60.1 percent of the vote (8,058 votes), according to the updated numbers released by the BOE. Other Democratic candidates in the race include Moumita Ahmed (22.5 percent of the vote), Saifur Khan (8.6 percent of the vote) and Mohammed Uddin (8.4 percent of the vote). Because Gennaro secured more than 50 percent of the vote, a ranked-choice voting recount was not triggered in this race.

As for the Republican primary, Timothy Rosen secured 59.2 percent of the vote (478 votes), according to BOE’s updated results. Angelo King trailed with 36.2 percent of the vote. Because Rosen secured more than 50 percent of the vote, a ranked-choice voting recount was not triggered in this race. 

City Council District 25 (Elmhurst, Jackson Heights)

Shekar Krishnan currently holds the top spot among Democratic candidates after receiving 53.4 percent of the vote (5,547 votes) following seven rounds of RCV counting. Yi Andy Chen finished second with 46.6 percent of the vote (5,547 votes). Other candidates include Fatima Baryab, Liliana Melo, Manuel F. Perez, Alfonso Quiroz, William Salgado and Carolyn Tran.

City Council District 26 (Sunnyside, Woodside, Long Island City, Astoria and Dutch Kills)

Julie Won currently holds the top spot among Democratic candidates after receiving 56.7 percent of the vote (6,820 votes) following 15 rounds of RCV counting. Amit Bagga finished second with 43.3 percent of the vote. Other candidates include Jonathan Bailey, Lorenzo Brea, Julia Forman, Glennis Gomez, Badrun Khan, Denise Keehan-Smith, Hailie Kim, Jesse Laymon, Sultan Maruf, Brent O’Leary, Steven Raga, Emily Sharpe and Ebony Young.

City Council District 27 (Cambria Heights, Hollis, Jamaica, St. Albans, Queens Village, and Springfield Gardens)

Nantasha Williams currently holds the top spot among Democratic candidates after securing 72.9 percent of the vote (11,807 votes) following 13 rounds of RCV counting. James Johnson finished second with 27.1 percent of the vote. Other candidates include Marie Adam-Ovide, Kerryanne Burke, Jason Myles Clark, Leroy Gadsden, Linda Guillebeaux, Esq., Rene Hill, Al-Hassan Kanu, Harold C. Miller Jr., Anthony Rivers and Jermaine Sean Smith.

City Council District 28 (Jamaica, Richmond Hill, Rochdale Village, South Ozone Park)

Democratic incumbent Adrienne E. Adams holds the top spot among Democratic candidates, having secured 53.4 percent of the vote (7,485 votes). Because Adams secured more than 50 percent of the vote, a ranked-choice voting recount was not triggered in this race. Other Democratic candidates in the race include Japneet Singh and Ruben Wills.

City Council District 29 (Rego Park, Forest Hills, Kew Gardens and Richmond Hill)

Lynn Schulman currently holds the top spot among Democratic candidates after receiving 60 percent of the vote (7,228 votes) following eight rounds of RCV counting. Aleda Gagarin finished second with 40 percent of the vote. Other candidates include David Aronov, Avi Cyperstein, Sheryl Fetik, Eliseo Labayen, Douglas Shapiro, Edwin Wong and Donghui Zang.

City Council District 30 (Ridgewood, Glendale, Maspeth, Middle Village, Woodhaven and Woodside)

Incumbent Councilman Robert Holden received 54.6 percent of the vote (5,245 votes) with Juan Ardila trailing behind at 45 percent (4,3226 votes), according to Tuesday night’s results from the city’s Board of Elections. Since there are only two candidates in the race, a ranked-choice voting count was not triggered. 

City Council District 31 (Averne, Brookville, Edgemere, Far Rockaway, Laurelton, Rosedale and Springfield Gardens)

Councilwoman Selvena Brooks-Powers breezed to a primary victory in District 31 in the Rockaways, a seat she first captured during a special election in February to replace Donovan Richards. Brooks-Powers received 67.4 percent of the vote (10,770 votes) as of Tuesday night, July 6. Other candidates include Nicole S. Lee (19 percent of the vote) and Nancy J. Martinez (12.8 percent of the vote).

While the official results will not be revealed until the anticipated date of July 12, ranked-choice voting was not be implemented in this case, as Brooks-Powers received more than the 50 percent requirement to win the seat outright.

City Council District 32 (Parts of Belle Harbor, Breezy Point, Broad Channel, Howard Beach, Lindenwood, Neponsit, Ozone Park, Richmond Hill, Rockaway Park, Roxbury, South Ozone Park, West Hamilton Beach and Woodhaven)

Felicia Singh currently holds the top spot among Democratic candidates after receiving 52.5 percent of the vote (4,684 votes) following three rounds of RCV counting. Michael G. Scala finished second with 47.5 percent of the vote (4,243 votes). Other candidates include Kaled A. Alamarie, Bella A. Matias, Shaeleigh Severino and Helal A. Sheikh.

As for the Republican primary, Joann Ariola secured 82 percent of the vote, according to the BOE’s results. Angelo King trailed with 17 percent of the vote. Because Ariola secured more than 50 percent of the vote, a ranked-choice voting recount was not triggered in this race.

This story was updated Tuesday, July 6.

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