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Your go-to roundup of fall books for all reading levels – QNS.com

Your go-to roundup of fall books for all reading levels

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BY MIA SALAS

Looking to sneak in some extra fall reading in between remote and in-person classes? Maybe you want your kiddos to brush up on their reading skills? Well, we have the go-to fall reading list for you! We scoped out the latest in children’s books to round up new releases (and some throwbacks) for all reading levels, from early readers to young adults. We’re really loving some of the reads centered around diversity & inclusion, and we were sure to include a lot in our guide for fall reading. Browse our list and start reading with your kiddos!

There’s an Alien in Your Book by Tom Fletcher, illustrated by Greg Abbott

There’s an Alien in Your Book by Tom Fletcher, illustrated by Greg Abbott

Early Readers (Preschool – 1st Grade) 

We’re obsessed with this picture book that was just released in late June. For little ones who just can’t seem to sit still to read a whole book (classic kiddos!), this story is interactive. Little readers have to jiggle, bounce, and turn their book around as they try to launch Alien back up into space. You may remember Fletcher’s There’s A Superhero in Your BookThere’s an Elf in Your Book, or many more, so this latest release is an addition to his engaging series.

I Am Every Good Thing by Derrick Barnes, illustrated by Gordon C. James

I Am Every Good Thing by Derrick Barnes, illustrated by Gordon C. James

Early Readers (Preschool – 1st Grade) 

On sale September 1, this is a must-read for your preschoolers. This confident Black narrator is proud of who he is, and he encourages young readers to take the time to understand the people around them. What we love about this book is that your little ones will not only see someone who knows who he is, what he wants, and what he can accomplish, but they’ll also see someone who is often misunderstood. We highly recommend this timely children’s book this fall.

The Tiny Chef by Rachel Larson, Adam Reid, and Ozi Akturk 

The Tiny Chef by Rachel Larson, Adam Reid, and Ozi Akturk

Early Readers (Preschool – 1st Grade) 

From the creators of The Tiny Chef Show comes their debut children’s book about the Tiny Chef who misplaces his favorite recipe book. How could he possibly whip up the best creations without his recipes? After looking for it for a while, Tiny Chef decides to go for a walk, and suddenly he has an idea for a new recipe. Your kiddos will love the Tiny Chef illustrations, and they’ll take away a message about perseverance, creativity, and confidence. Buy this book starting September 15.

 

She Persisted in Sports by Chelsea Clinton, illustrated by Alexandra Boiger

She Persisted in Sports by Chelsea Clinton, illustrated by Alexandra Boiger

Early Readers (Preschool – 1st Grade) 

On sale September 22, this is our top pick for your little girl. An inspiring story about women in sports, your young girls will feel a sense of empowerment as they read about some of the greatest female athletes of all time. While we’ve come a long way, women have constantly been told that they can’t achieve their dreams. In this third She Persisted book, Clinton tackles the challenges that women athletes have overcome, just in time for the Olympics!

Will You Be My Friend? by Sam McBratney, illustrated by Anita Jeram

Will You Be My Friend? by Sam McBratney, illustrated by Anita Jeram

Early Readers (Preschool – 1st Grade) 

Remember Guess How Much I Love You, written twenty-five years ago? Well, we now have a sequel to this popular children’s book! Little Nutbrown Hare finds a new friend while he’s out on one of his adventures. Young readers will follow this heartwarming story of friendship, and maybe even learn something about how to be a great friend in their lives. We recommend pairing this with Guess How Much I Love You if your little one hasn’t read it yet! On sale September 29, so this is the perfect October read to look forward to.

Antiracist Baby by Ibram X. Kendi, illustrated by Ashley Lukashevsky

Antiracist Baby by Ibram X. Kendi, illustrated by Ashley Lukashevsky

Early Readers (Preschool – 1st Grade) 

A #1 New York Times Bestseller, Antiracist Baby is a great way to start up these sometimes difficult, but necessary conversations with your little one about racism in society. There are even discussion prompts to help you guide your kiddo through recognizing bias in their life. Your little ones will love learning about the nine steps for building a more equitable world through beautiful illustrations and educational text.

Just Like Me by Vanessa Brantley-Newton

Just Like Me by Vanessa Brantley-Newton

Early Readers (Preschool – 1st Grade) 

We’re crazy about this collection of poetry and illustrations filled with stories about all kinds of girls: girls who feel happy, sad, scared, powerful; girls who love their bodies and girls who don’t; country girls, city girls; girls who love their mother and girls who wish they had a father. This book explores self-esteem, positivity, diversity and inclusion, and so much more. The artwork is absolutely beautiful, and your little ones will definitely appreciate a glimpse into poetry, art, and the power that this form of writing can have.

Absolutely Alfie and the Furry, Purry Secret by Sally Warner, illustrated by Shearry Malone

Absolutely Alfie and the Furry, Purry Secret by Sally Warner, illustrated by Shearry Malone

First Chapter Books (Grades 1 – 3)

If you were a fan of the Judy Moody books, then we highly recommend this debut children’s chapter book for your kiddos. A story of a bossy friend and her kittens that Alfie becomes very obsessed with, we’re loving the humor and lessons of friendship that this book has. But be careful— your kiddo may start asking for a kitten after they’re done with this read! Or they may just want to get their hands on the next book in the series: Absolutely Alfie and the First Week Friends.

Dory Fantasmagory: Tiny Tough by Abby Hanlon

Dory Fantasmagory: Tiny Tough by Abby Hanlon

First Chapter Books (Grades 1 – 3)

If you’ve been following this super popular series, then your kiddos will be very excited to know that the fifth book is coming out this fall on September 8! Dory thinks that her sister’s lost treasure (a friendship bracelet) has something to do with pirates, so she heads to the sea to meet up with a pirate crew. This is a great introduction to chapter books, full of imagination, adventure, and much more!

Sarai and the Around the World Fair by Sarai Gonzalez, illustrated by Monica Brown

Sarai and the Around the World Fair by Sarai Gonzalez, illustrated by Monica Brown

First Chapter Books (Grades 1 – 3)

In the fourth and latest book in the series, Sarai goes to her school’s first Around the World Fair. After she outgrows her bike, she worries that she’ll never get to travel anywhere, but the fair unlocks a ton of possibilities. The series is inspired by the life of 11-year-old viral sensation and social activist Sarai Gonzalez. We’re here for the Latinx representation in children’s first chapter books!

Fortress of the Stone Dragon, by Tracey West, illustrated by Matt Loveridge

Fortress of the Stone Dragon, by Tracey West, illustrated by Matt Loveridge

First Chapter Books (Grades 1 – 3)

The 17th book in the Dragon Masters series is finally here this fall on October 6! The series is a part of Scholastic’s early chapter book line with easy-to-read text, illustrations, and a super engaging plot. In this book, the Dragon Masters have to stop an evil wizard from becoming the most powerful wizard in the world. For your adventure-loving kiddos, this book is just for them.

 

Brave. Black. First. by Cheryl Hudson, illustrated by Erin K. Robinson

Brave. Black. First. by Cheryl Hudson, illustrated by Erin K. Robinson

Upper-Level Chapter Books (Grades 4 – 6) 

Published in collaboration with the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, this is a must-read for the fall! Your kiddo will read the stories of over 50 incredible African American women, like Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, Serena Williams, Michelle Obama, and many more. A book of inspiration, bravery, and heroism, we 100% recommend this for your daughters (and sons!) in middle school or late elementary school.

The Lonely Heart of Maybelle Lane by Kate O’Shaughnessy

The Lonely Heart of Maybelle Lane by Kate O’Shaughnessy

Upper-Level Chapter Books (Grades 4 – 6) 

Your middle schooler is sure to binge-read this book in one day! Maybelle loves sounds and music, especially the recording she has of her dad’s laugh saved in a voicemail. Then one day, she hears his laugh on the radio, and he announces that he’s going to be a judge for a singing contest in Nashville. Maybelle decides to take a trip to Nashville to compete in the contest and meet her dad in person. Along the way, Maybelle finds courage and true friends in her journey to Nashville.

Wink by Rob Harrell

Wink by Rob Harrell

Upper-Level Chapter Books (Grades 4 – 6) 

For your kiddos who are nervous about starting middle school or moving up a grade, this story will give them a new perspective that will calm their nerves and encourage empathy. A seventh grader is diagnosed with eye cancer, and all he wants is to live a normal life. He doesn’t want to be called “the cancer kid” or have to wear a hat to cover up his hair loss. Both heartbreaking and hilarious, uplifting and unforgettable, this novel is based off of the author’s real experience, making it personal and moving for your middle schooler.

Orange for the Sunsets by Tina Athaide

Orange for the Sunsets by Tina Athaide

Upper-Level Chapter Books (Grades 4 – 6) 

When Idi Amin announces that Indians have ninety days to leave the country, suddenly Asha and her best friend Yesofu are forced to confront their different backgrounds: Indian and African. As tensions between Indians and Africans rise, the friends are torn apart between family, friends, and society. Living under Ugandan President Amin’s divisive rule, they must consider where and who they call home. This upper level chapter book is such a powerful read that will introduce your kids to diverse perspectives.

Other Words for Home by Jasmine Warga

Other Words for Home by Jasmine Warga

Upper-Level Chapter Books (Grades 4 – 6) 

A heartwarming story about losing, but then rediscovering home, Other Words for Home is one of our top picks for upper level chapter books. A young girl has to leave Syria to move to America with her mom as things in her hometown start to get volatile. At first, Jude struggles with the cultural differences and her new label of “Middle Eastern,” an identity she’s never known before. But soon Jude finds family and friends in America, and along the way she also finds herself. Both a New York Times Bestseller and Newbery Honor Book, this story will teach your tweens a lot about multiculturalism, diversity and inclusion, and what it means to empathize with someone else’s experience.

Smile Like You Mean It by Willow Hadley

Smile Like You Mean It by Willow Hadley

Young Adult (Grades 7 – 10) 

After Charlotte’s father died, her mother changed. One night after an incident with her mother, Charlotte is arrested and taken to juvie. When Charlotte is released, her uncle surprises her and takes her home, where she meets his step-son who is her age and has four best friends who are all so welcoming. As Charlotte deals with anxiety and her troubled past, she also learns to let people in, and she grows close to the group. Just released this summer in late August, we really like this story of overcoming challenges for teens and young adults.

Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward

Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward

Young Adult (Grades 7 – 10) 

While this is surely not a new read, we definitely recommend it if your teen hasn’t read it yet. Note that the age range leans more on the 9th to 10th grade side. This novel explores family dynamics, poverty, and sacrifice. Readers grow attached to this family as they protect each other through it all— through the reality of rural poverty, loneliness, feelings of abandonment, teen pregnancy, and violence. Though sometimes a difficult novel to read because of the perspectives that it reveals and the issues that it tackles, we couldn’t recommend a story more perfect because it prompts self-growth and awareness as your now not-so-little kiddos are growing up.

Good Talk by Mira Jacob

Good Talk by Mira Jacob

Young Adult (Grades 7 – 10) 

We really recommend this book for both young adults and adults, but it can especially have an effect on teens who are still learning, absorbing, and discovering who they are. This is a unique read because it’s a graphic memoir told through conversations. The story takes readers through key moments in America’s history, like 9-11, Obama’s presidency, and the 2016 presidential election. Through it all, Jacob tries to explain to her mixed race, six-year-old son what it all means, and he has a lot of questions. This memoir tackles racism in America, interracial families, American identity, and much more as Jacob reflects on her own childhood and how she learned the answers to some of her son’s questions.

The Gravity of Us by Phil Stamper

The Gravity of Us by Phil Stamper

Young Adult (Grades 7 – 10)

When Cal’s father is selected for a highly publicized NASA mission to Mars, Cal and his family move to Houston from Brooklyn, where Cal meets (and falls in love with) another “Astrokid,” Leon. But when secrets about the program surface, Cal tries to reveal the truth without hurting the people closest to him. Stamper explores self-doubt, first love, and identity in this young adult novel. We love the LGBTQ+ representation in literature for teens!

This is All Your Fault by Aminah Mae Safi

This is All Your Fault by Aminah Mae Safi

Young Adult (Grades 7 – 10) 

Coming out on October 13, 2020, we are patiently waiting for this fall read to print! Set over the course of one day, the story follows three young women determined to save their indie bookstore. We’re all about this feminist young adult novel, perfect for kids in grades 7 through 9 who are looking for a story of empowerment (and a transition from the “kiddy” books they’ve grown out of).

This story originally appeared on newyorkfamily.com

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