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$62.8M turns off southeast flooding

April showers bring May flowers, but for residents of southeast Queens, rain meant swamped streets, flooded basements and nightmares for home and business owners.

But not anymore.

The completion of a $62.8 million reconstruction project at 99th Avenue and 110th Avenue in Jamaica and Saint Albans will now ensure a more reliable water supply system and alleviate flooding, according to officials.

The project began in September 2006 and added one 48-inch trunk main more than three miles in length and more than five miles of smaller water distribution mains. The new water mains will improve water supply distribution by providing a critical redundancy that will minimize disruption to consumers during any future water main work and service shutdowns. Residents will also be less likely to experience low water pressure and discolored water when other water mains in the vicinity are being repaired or upgraded.

In addition, three miles of storm sewers, two miles of sanitary sewers, 287 catch basins and 242 manholes were installed. The reconstruction also included the installation of 40,442 linear feet of concrete curb, 249,805 square feet of concrete sidewalk, 84,320 square yards of asphalt roadway, and 269 trees.

The project was funded by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and Department of Transportation (DOT) and managed by the Department of Design and Construction.

“The completion of the $62.8 million project consisting of water main replacement and the upgrading of our storm and sanitary sewers in southeast Queens marks a major victory for the long suffering residents of South Jamaica and St. Albans,” said Councilmember Leroy Comrie. “Hopefully this will solve the water pressure problem in these communities and alleviate flooding. There were problems along the way but when I brought them to the attention of the agencies they were able to resolve them. I want to thank DEP, DOT and DDC for their work on this project and also express my appreciation to our civics, churches and Community Board 12 who long advocated for this important reconstruction.”

The reconstruction was from Sutphin Boulevard to Francis Lewis Boulevard; 110th Avenue from Sutphin Boulevard to 155th Street; 153rd Street from 110th Avenue to 110th Road; 110th Avenue from 155th Street to 173rd Street; 164th Place from 110th Avenue to 109th Avenue; 167th Street from 110th Avenue to 111th Avenue; 172nd Street from 110th Avenue to 109th Avenue; 173rd Street from 110th Avenue to Liberty Avenue; 109th Avenue from 173rd Street to 175th Street; Liberty Avenue from 173rd Street to 104th Avenue; 177th Street from Liberty Avenue to 93rd Avenue; 180th Street from Liberty Avenue to 104th Avenue; 104th Avenue from Liberty Avenue to Farmers Boulevard; 186th Street from Liberty Avenue to 104th Avenue; 189th Street from Liberty Avenue to 99th Avenue; Henderson Avenue from 189th Street to Farmers Boulevard; 190th Street from 99th Avenue to Woodhull Avenue; 99th Avenue from 189th Street to Farmers Boulevard; Farmers Boulevard from 104th Avenue to Woodhull Avenue; 99th Avenue from Farmers Boulevard to Francis Lewis Boulevard; and 195th Street from 99th Avenue to Woodhull Avenue.

“It was long overdue, but the community is pleased. We’ve been waiting for years to get relief from the flooding condition, especially at 177th Street and Liberty Avenue near the underpass,” said Yvonne Reddick, District Manager, Community Board 12. “With the new trees and sidewalks, not only does it beautify the community, it alleviates street flooding. This was one of the largest projects done in Community Board 12 history.”

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