Screenshot via Twitter/@BidurBista1, insets courtesy of the NYPD

Two men from Flushing have been locked up for their alleged roles in a deadly shooting at a Jackson Heights train station earlier this month.

Tito Martinez-Alvarenga, 19, of Linden Place and Victor Lopez, 20, of 160th Street found themselves in handcuffs on Thursday night after being questioned and arrested by NYPD detectives.

They were charged in connection with the Feb. 3 execution of Abel Mosso, 20, at the 90th Street-Elmhurst Avenue station. Mosso was attacked by a group of young men on the station platform, then fatally shot in the head. The entire incident was caught on camera in graphic footage that circulated through social media channels.

Previously, the NYPD arrested Ramiro Gonzalez, 26, a reputed member of the MS-13 street gang, on Feb. 5 for his alleged participation in Mosso’s murder.

According to law enforcement sources, Gonzalez, Martinez-Alvarenga and Lopez were part of the mob that attacked Mosso — a reputed member of a rival gang — at about 12:45 p.m. on Feb. 3 while they were on board a Manhattan-bound 7 train that pulled into the 90th Street station.

When the doors opened, authorities said, the group dragged Mosso off the train and onto the platform, where the assault continued. Before a crowd of horrified onlookers, Gutierrez allegedly pulled out a gun and opened fire as Mosso tried to rise to his feet. The shooting occurred off camera, but the recorded footage including several popping sounds indicative of gunfire. Following the shooting, the suspects fled the scene.

Officers from the 115th Precinct and EMS units responded to the shooting. They found Mosso with several gunshot wounds to his head and face; paramedics pronounced him dead at the scene.

Martinez-Alvarenga and Lopez were arraigned on Feb. 22 in Queens Criminal Court and ordered held without bail; they must return to court on March 8. They were each charged with second-degree murder, gang assault, kidnapping and criminal possession of a weapon; if convicted, they could face up to 25 years to life behind bars.

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