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City rolls out its Dusk and Darkness campaign warning drivers of increased dangers in early darkness – QNS.com

City rolls out its Dusk and Darkness campaign warning drivers of increased dangers in early darkness

Courtesy of NYCDOT

As daylight savings time ended Sunday morning, the city launched its third annual Dusk and Darkness campaign, raising driver awareness that crashes involving pedestrians dramatically increases especially during evening hours during the fall and winter.

Serious collisions increase by nearly 40 percent after the clocks fall back, according to the city Department of Transportation. During an event in Times Square on Nov. 2, officials also introduces “Alive at 25,” a new program directed at young drivers who were behind the wheel in 20 percent pf fatal crashes last year.

“We are relentlessly pursuing Vision Zero and working to save lives every day,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said. “Our Dusk and Darkness campaign helps us further that goal, especially at nighttime hours — and dangerous driving — increase. At the same time, educating our young drivers will help curb dangerous driving habits before they take hold, making the road safer for everyone.”

The NYPD will increase it evening and nighttime enforcement on the most hazardous violations such as speeding and failure-to-yield to pedestrians. The DOT is running radio ads during the evening commutes alerting drivers to the dangers of lower visibility and encouraging them to follow the 25 MPH citywide speed limit.

“To make all New Yorkers safer, it is imperative that we raise awareness about the dangers of reduced daylight and the onset of cold weather,” Police Commissioner James O’Neill said. “For the third year in a row, our Dusk and Darkness safety campaign will be a crucial part of that. The NYPD will conduct precisely-focused enforcement in areas that have experienced fatalities, and ensure that everyone adheres to the traffic rules. As we move forward together, we will build on our previous success and further reduce traffic-related deaths.”

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